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    Introduction to Designing Corrugated Metal Pipe (CMP) Stormwater Detention Systems
    (Print PDH from the May/June 2017 issue of Informed Infrastructure)

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    The two essential functions of a stormwater management system are to control the 1) quality and 2) quantity of runoff leaving a site. There are various ways to do this; a common method is with an aboveground system in the form of a detention pond, but these take up usable land space. This is not a major issue in rural areas, but in urban environments, land space is expensive, and a loss of land space results in lost revenue.

    As a result, engineers and developers often turn to underground solutions, which take many forms. One of the most common is an underground detention system made from corrugated metal pipe (CMP). These systems are employed on a site to reduce the quantity of stormwater runoff leaving a site by temporarily storing the runoff that exceeds a site’s allowable discharge rate and releasing it slowly through time.

    Designing CMP detention systems is a complex task. This article is not intended to be a complete design guide; it is intended to address three questions engineers often have regarding designing CMP detention systems.

    As seen in the May/June 2017 issue of Informed Infrastructure magazine.

     

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    Understanding the Impact of Pipe Stiffness on Long-Term Deflections
    (Print PDH from the March/April 2017 issue of Informed Infrastructure)

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    Pipe stiffness in the pipe industry is a standard test that is performed on actual pipe samples to determine their ring stiffness. Many product specifications in the pipe industry require a minimum target pipe stiffness be achieved as a requirement for that standard.

    As seen in the March/April 2017 issue of Informed Infrastructure magazine.

     

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    Designing Dam Embankments with Articulating Concrete Block Systems (Print PDH from the January/February 2017 issue of Informed Infrastructure)

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    Dams are called “installations containing dangerous forces” in International Humanitarian Law; there is potential for great destruction to people, property and the environment in the event of a dam failure. The forces that make dams dangerous also provide essential benefits such as drinking water, flood control, power production, irrigation and recreation. Holding a balance between destructive forces and essential benefits lies, to some degree, in protecting the dam from soil erosion when an overtopping event occurs.

    As seen in the January/February 2017 issue of Informed Infrastructure magazine.

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    Helical Design: Code Compliance and Effects of Seismic Activity (Archived Webcast)

    Originally Aired March 1, 2017. This webcast has expired

    Helical piles and anchors have been used in construction applications for more than 175 years. The first recorded use of helical piles was in 1836 by Alexander Mitchell in England. The helical pile industry has seen substantial growth in the last 20 years as most practicing engineers have recognized the strength, versatility, and many applications of the system.
    The popularity of helical piles has grown so much, the International Code Council (ICC) established acceptance criteria AC358 for helical piles in 2007. ICC inducted helical piles into the International Building Code in 2009. However, helical piles were barely mentioned in undergraduate and graduate civil engineering studies.
    The presentation will cover the design, applications, and building code requirements of helical piles.

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    Recommendations for Bioretention Media Qualification (Print PDH from the November/December 2016 issue of Informed Infrastructure)

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    Engineered bioretention media is optimized to filter and/or infiltrate stormwater runoff through a plant-soil-microbe complex. A successful bioretention installation involves oversight—not just onsite, but having a framework in place for transferring raw materials to a blended, commercially installed product. Read this “instruction manual” on how to successfully implement a bioretention media strategy. Then take the accompanying quiz to receive continuing education credit.

    As seen in the November/December 2016 issue of Informed Infrastructure magazine.

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